TEFL World - the latest listings for TEFL teaching jobs and TEFL training courses as well as resources for TEFL teaching and learning

  • Teach English in China
  • Welcome to TEFL World. We have the latest listings for TEFL teaching jobs abroad and a wide variety of other resources for professionals interested in Teaching English as a Foreign Language. You can find jobs, post a resume, find TEFL training courses or promote your private tutoring. In addition, TEFL World contains information about Teaching English as a Foreign Language, teaching resources, teacher lesson plan ideas as well as TEFL teaching resources. Please browse TEFL World to find teaching jobs abroad and many other resources for TEFL teachers worldwide.

    TEFL Teaching scam Europe

  • TEFL Teacher Training
  • Number 16 / Unique English: Bad Employer warning in Zaragoza!


    • Number 16 / Unique English: Bad Employer warning in Zaragoza!


      By: Douglas < Show E-mail >

      Date: Sat, 04 Nov 2017

      Location: (Spain)

      Number 16, operated by an outfit called Unique English, is a chain of schools currently operating in Zaragoza and Madrid. They are a real company and they pay your salary. I'm not claiming this is a "scam" in the strict sense of the word but they are very bad employers.

      I joined after being offered a "25 hour work week" and "assistance with finding accomodation". Both of these promises were swiftly broken, not only to myself but to many other new recruits. The teacher turnover here is unbelievable. They are continuously hiring because so many teachers leave in disgust after a couple of months. I saw over 20 new teachers arrive in the 4 month period that I worked with them.

      Upon arrival with around ten other new teachers we were hosted for 5 days in the Hostel Catalunya on Calle Coso in Zaragoza, near the Calle San Miguel school where we had our training. We were informed that we had to find our own accomodation. "You're all adults" they told us despite clearly stating in their e-mail correspondence and in-person interviews that assistance was provided. We were expected to begin teaching full-time after one week of un-paid training. Hence many of us ended up living out of hostels while being made to teach for outrageous working hours. A 12 hour day is common-place here and you often have to work Saturdays. I was working so much I hadn't time to get a bank account or view appartments, meanwhile I was draining money in a hostel each night.

      In the first month a staff meeting was held where the Directors promised change. They admitted that mass resignations had taken place due to long-working hours and claimed that they had taken on more students than they had teachers to cover, in light of a surging demand for lessons, and as a result the teachers were being over-worked and over-loaded. I was impressed by this meeting and it convinced me to stay, as they promised that they were bringing in new teachers and would soon reduce our working hours. Another promise broken.

      After two months nothing had changed. Several teachers had resigned by this point, including more experienced teachers who had been there for 6 months or more. It wasn't long before I realised that virtually nobody stays here more than a year. In my previous TEFL job there were teachers who had settled down locally and remained at the same place for years. It struck me as highly suspicious that everyone on the books at Number 16 had only joined a few months previously, with few exceptions. I started asking around, talking to former employees and more experienced staff and the picture became clearer and clearer. Number 16 may be a legitimate business, but it's as close to a scam as you can get while remaining legitimate. They have no interest in job satisfaction or the conditions their teachers are exposed to. The firm is a merry-go-round where teachers are replaced as quickly as they quit. The school hires all year-round and brings in a continuous stram of new teachers with their online job ads offering a "25 hour" work-week and "unique method". The reality is you get a 60 hour work-week while being paid for half that. You get squeezed to the bone. They have apparantly been doing this for years. I approached other schools in Zaragoza and found out that Number 16 has a very bad reputation within the industry here. It is well-known that they manipulate their employees mercilessly. 

      From a teachers perspective you can find yourself trapped. Having paid a deposit on my apartment, got a Spanish SIM and bank account, and with the TEFL hiring season months away what was I to do but grit my teeth and get on with it? I endured it for 4 months, saved what I could while working like a slave, and then left in January having been made an offer elsewhere. I wasted 4 months of my life at Number 16. I am writing this to encourage others not to make the same mistake. This may be a place to get a "foot in the door" with TEFL, for somebody without any relevant experience struggling to land a job, this is a place where you will get work and training, but at the cost of blood, sweat and tears. Be careful. I recommend that anyone thinking about joining this school insist on being put in contact with former and current teachers before accepting an offer or booking a flight. Know what you're signing up for and don't be lured in by promises of an easy life in sunny Spain! You'll be too exhausted to enjoy it. 

      Re: Number 16 / Unique English: Bad Employer warning in Zaragoza! (views: 85)

      (United Kingdom) - Thu, 21 Feb 2019
      Posted by Dave

      It´s a great school, I´ve worked here for a year. Sorry you didn´t have the same experience! 

      Re: Number 16 / Unique English: Bad Employer warning in Zaragoza! (views: 73)

      (United Kingdom) - Wed, 20 Feb 2019
      Posted by T

      Perhaps the information is outdated, but the aforementioned problems with Number 16 are/were anything but 'completely false'. They are also specific to Zaragoza, and maybe these issues haven't arisen in other locations.   It's pointless to cover each problem again, as the original post is well-written and gives a comprehensive insight into what makes working for the academy so difficult. What is worth mentioning, however, is that teachers need to be aware of the reasons behind Number 16's flaws, and ask themselves if that is a company they aspire to work for.   To try and keep it concise, it's a business that is spreadingly rapidly. Its owner, Sergio, is highly ambitious and clearly wants a chain of schools throughout the country because, as long as Spain is mostly comprised of small academies merely catering to the desires of students who only want a Cambridge certificate, there is certainly great potential there.  This clearly comes at a cost, which is the workers' salaries and contentness.  During my time at Number 16, I felt like I was part of a juggernaut that was set at just one speed all the time - full steam ahead. If you are a seasoned teacher who is accustomed to having a burden placed on them, or perhaps somebody who loves the rush of always being on their feet, it won't perturb you so much. If you're new to teaching and looking to get some experience, it can easily be seen as a baptism of fire. Number 16 is predominantly comprised of the latter, hence its high staff turnover rate. Even the "veterans" can struggle to come to terms with the demands.   It's not all doom and gloom, of course. Number 16 does have a professional feel (at least to outsiders) to it that other schools could take a few lessons from, and I am a big fan of its method in a country that is too obsessed with what a piece of paper says instead of what they can say. So, who knows. Maybe this is merely a period that is part of a bigger plan, and perhaps Number 16 will/has slowed down and given more consideration to its employees.   Potential employees do at least deserve to be aware of its history and understand what they might be going into.

      Re: Number 16 / Unique English: Bad Employer warning in Zaragoza! (views: 82)

      (United Arab Emirates) - Wed, 20 Feb 2019
      Posted by T

      Perhaps the information is outdated, but the aforementioned problems with Number 16 are/were anything but 'completely false'. They are also specific to Zaragoza, and maybe these issues haven't arisen in other locations.   It's pointless to cover each problem again, as the original post is well-written and gives a comprehensive insight into what makes working for the academy so difficult. What is worth mentioning, however, is that teachers need to be aware of the reasons behind Number 16's flaws, and ask themselves if that is a company they aspire to work for.   To try and keep it concise, it's a business that is spreadingly rapidly. Its owner, Sergio, is highly ambitious and clearly wants a chain of schools throughout the country because, as long as Spain is mostly comprised of small academies merely catering to the desires of students who only want a Cambridge certificate, there is certainly great potential there.  This clearly comes at a cost, which is the workers' salaries and contentness.  During my time at Number 16, I felt like I was part of a juggernaut that was set at just one speed all the time - full steam ahead. If you are a seasoned teacher who is accustomed to having a burden placed on them, or perhaps somebody who loves the rush of always being on their feet, it won't perturb you so much. If you're new to teaching and looking to get some experience, it can easily be seen as a baptism of fire. Number 16 is predominantly comprised of the latter, hence its high staff turnover rate. Even the "veterans" can struggle to come to terms with the demands.   It's not all doom and gloom, of course. Number 16 does have a professional feel (at least to outsiders) to it that other schools could take a few lessons from, and I am a big fan of its method in a country that is too obsessed with what a piece of paper says instead of what they can say. So, who knows. Maybe this is merely a period that is part of a bigger plan, and perhaps Number 16 will/has slowed down and given more consideration to its employees.   Potential employees do at least deserve to be aware of its history and understand what they might be going into.      

      Re: Number 16 / Unique English: Bad Employer warning in Zaragoza! (views: 89)

      (Australia) - Wed, 20 Feb 2019
      Posted by Clare

      Total agree with everything you said and I was there 2-3 years before. The other shocking point is the method they actually use to teach English which is absolutely rubbish and not used in countries where I have taught around the world. No organisation, no structure - a rip off for students and teachers.

      Re: Number 16 / Unique English: Bad Employer warning in Zaragoza! (views: 695)

      (Spain) - Thu, 13 Sep 2018
      Posted by D

      I feel I have to comment on this as I think it's either completely false or outdated. I started working at Number 16 in September 2017 and continue to do so.   When I first arrived one of the team leaders personally helped me find accomodation by speaking to landlords (my spanish is/was not great) and also accompanying me to flat viewings in order to translate and help with the details! I found an apartment in my training week sharing with spanish students and its great!   During my interview with one of the directors it was made clear that the contract was for 34 hours full time work. I've had to do more than that at times in order to cover sickness or holidays but thats been the same in every job i've ever had!! Most of the time I work the contracted hours. The company has also been flexible if I needed to change shifts in order to go to sports practice. I love working here and won't be moving on anytime soon   

      To Edit or Delete this posting:

      Edit Delete